Best Children's Books for Black History Month

Best Children's Books for Black History Month


Black History Month is especially important to me. I strongly believe that if you want to know where you are going, you need to know where you're from. As a mother, I now get to relive the excitement of learning about some of our nation's black heroes again. The following are some of my favorite children's books that explore these heroes and their service to American history.

1. Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky
Ages 3-7

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Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky follows the story of a young girls named Cassie who retraces the steps escaping slaves took on the real Underground Railroad with Harriet Tubman as her guide. Throughout their journey Aunt Harriet describes the railroad in the sky and retraces her route to freedom.

2. I Too, Am America 
Ages 4-8
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I Too, Am America is poetry picture book based on Langston Hugh's most celebrated poem. With it's flowing poetry and stunning illustrations, I Too, Am America serves as a reminder to all Americans that we are united despite our differences.

3. Nothing But Trouble: The Story of Althea Gibson 
Ages 3-7

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Nothing But Trouble follows the story of Althea Gibson, the first African American ever to compete in and win the Wimbledon Cup. In addition to the historical significance of Gibson's story, this book also proves that even "troublemakers" can aspire to be great, and that through hard work and dedication, anything is possible.

4. If A Bus Could Talk
Ages 4-8
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If A Bus Could Talk, is the story of how one woman sparked the Civil Rights movement. On her way to school, a young girl named Marcie embarks on a magical bus ride where she meets Rosa Parks and learns about the bus ride that changed America.

5. My Daddy, Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Ages 4-8


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Written by Martin Luther King III, this memoir gives an inside look into one of this nation's most beloved leaders. Through the eyes of his son, readers a given an intimate look at the man and leader behind the Civil Rights movement. 

What are your plans for Black History Month this year? Have you read any of these before? Do you have any favorites you like to read to your children?


6 comments :

  1. Great post. You are right, kids show know where their ancestors come from. I hope to some day get my kids to understand that my grandmother came to this country at 19 w/ a baby in tow, via boat w/out knowing a word of the English language and managed to work hard to get where she eventually got in life. #DBB

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    1. What an amazing story! Your grandmother sounds like a strong woman. I think children today take for granted the life that they live. Things are often times handed to them without them having to work for it. Unlike our ancestors who had to fight tooth and nail for half of what we have.

      Thank you for stopping by and sharing your story!

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  2. Great picks! We read a few of these last year. I definitely believe in teaching children about their history and where they come from. I think that so many parents have gotten away from doing that. Now days, it surprises me how little Black children (teens included) know about slavery and the Civil Rights Movement. When Nelson Mandela died, I saw one teen write on a relative's status asking who he was? Like really?!

    There is no reason that 16 year shouldn't have known who Nelson Mandela was. At the end of day, if our children know nothing else, they should at the very least know their own history. It's important that they see what sacrificed for them have the lives and luxuries that they have today.

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    1. Wow, 16 and doesn't know who Nelson Mandela is. But sadly, could probably repeat every word from Jay-z's newest album. That just steams me up. We all need to stop with this idolization of people who have done nothing for us. Mandela brought an entire country together. Jay-Z raps about selling drugs and objectifies women.

      Btw, I'm loving your IG Black History photos. Please keep it up! I'll be on the lookout for them daily :)

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  3. Knowing our history is really important to helping us shape our future. These are great books. When my daughter was little, I bought her the Debbie Allen book (name escapes me right now).

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    1. I couldn't agree more Deauan. And I think I read one of those growing up! I remember my first love was Addy from American Girl. In fact, somewhere in my parents garage, I still have my Addy doll tucked away and waiting for my daughter to get old enough to take care of her.

      Thank you for stopping by and sharing!

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